How to Overcome Injuries and Cope with the Related Stress It Can Have on Your Life

July 31, 2018

                                                            

In a study of participants who suffered a severe injury, 54 percent stated having higher than average scores of depression, anxiety, and stress. Principally, if the damage affects a person’s job or favorite hobbies, they can experience overwhelming feelings of sadness, anger, sleep disruption, isolation, and even emotional changes in appetite. As all of these issues can affect not only your life but also the lives of your loved ones, it is crucial to address the stress you may be experiencing after an injury.

Your Stress Is Valid Regardless of Your Injury

An injury that affects your life can come in an infinite variety of forms. While some may think an injury must be brutal to induce stress, this idea is flawed. Massive wounds such as severe burns, amputations, and accidents will change a person’s lifestyle. However, even smaller injuries can cause stress if they compromise your job or were inflicted in disturbing ways. Something as minor as a broken finger could result in post-traumatic stress disorder if it damaged on-purpose, such as in domestic violence.

Anxiety Is a Form of Stress

Anxiety can increase substantially after an injury. Naturally, experiencing the pain and the after-effects of the event will often result in the trauma being replayed over and over in a person’s mind. Fear of something similar happening again can also spike anxiety levels. Moreover, the results of chronic anxiety are harmful to the body. Not only can it be isolating and increase cortisol levels, but a study by Harvard Health found that people with highest ranks of phobic anxiety were 59 percent more likely to suffer a heart attack than those without high tension.

Tips for Easing the Stress After a Traumatic Event

While every person’s path to healing and coping with stress will be different, there exist numerous ways you can minimize stress. In the first weeks after the event, avoid exposing yourself to things related to the trauma until you can slowly expose yourself to the trigger with a trained therapist. Avoid looking at disturbing images or videos in general. It can be tempting to drink but avoid excessive alcohol use as it is a depressant and can invoke anger in several individuals. Don’t hide out, but instead, seek help from a counselor as soon as possible.  

Trade Watching News for Physical Activity

If you watch the news, it might be a good idea to take a break from it. News too often focuses on negative stories and upsetting world events, and your mind needs to focus on hope and healing. If exercise was approved by your doctor, get some physical activity. Exercise releases endorphins and chemicals that ease stress and anxiety. If your legs are injured, try upper-body-only workouts, or vice versa.

Finding a counselor is not only a smart move, but the shame some people feel about it is a stigma from the past. Taking care of your mental health and stress levels is now known to be vital more than ever before. Search for someone to talk to in your area and stop living with unneeded anxiety, anger, and isolation.

 

Written By: Lucy Wyndham

Tags:depressionanxietytrauma

Deep Breathing for Mental and Physical Self-Improvement (Part 2)

July 20, 2018

In part one of this series, I discussed the basics of deep breathing and reviewed abdominal breathing, the foundation of all other deep breathing exercises.  If you haven’t read Deep Breathing for Mental and Physical Self-Improvement (Part 1), I’d suggest you do so before continuing.

Once you've got a firm grasp on abdominal breathing, you can move on to other techniques to enhance the health benefits of deep breathing.  

Counting Breaths

Many breathing techniques revolve around some type of counting system to get you started.  When your goal is relaxation, stress reduction, and better overall health, you generally want to focus on slowing down the pace of your breathing to start.  

Here's a really simple exercise to start with.  Get into position and start doing your abdominal breathing.  Once you get into a good rhythm, start counting how many seconds it takes to inhale and then exhale.  See if you can figure out an average for your normal breathing pace, let's say for example its 4 seconds to inhale and 4 seconds to exhale.  All you do now is focus on increasing the number of seconds it takes to breathe in and then out. Don't rush yourself, start by aiming for 5 seconds in and 5 seconds out.  Once you're able to maintain this pace for 5-10 minutes at a time, try 6 seconds in and six seconds out. Spread out the increases as much as you feel comfortable with. You can choose to increase by 1 second every day, every week, or even every month depending on your physical ability and comfort level.  You might progress quickly or slowly, everyone is different.

Another simple counting exercise is to count the number of breaths you take in a minute.  For this, you'll probably need some type of alarm or timer to make sure you are accurately counting in 1 minute increments.  Just like the last exercise, you want to start by establishing your baseline. Start your abdominal breathing, and then set your timer to go off in 1 minute.  Simply sit and count the number of breaths you take in a minute (1 breath = 1 inhale and 1 exhale). Let's say you start with 10 breaths per minute, you want to then focus on decreasing the number of breaths you take to 9 per minute.  Just like with the last exercise, take your time. Decrease the number of breaths you take per minute at a pace you are comfortable with.

The final basic counting method I'll discuss is what's called tactical breathing.  Tactical breathing is a breathing technique primarily used by people in high stress careers such as law enforcement, the military, and emergency services.  They use this technique because it helps reduce stress in moments of extremely high tension. Though an adrenaline response is a good thing for a policeman, soldier, or firefighter to have in a moment of crisis, it also has to be controlled in order for them to make the right decisions and act accordingly.  Tactical breathing can also be an effective exercise for anyone looking to have a technique to use in moments of extreme stress or panic in their own lives. The main difference between tactical breathing and the other breathing exercises I have reviewed is it includes holding your breath. Deep breathing typically involves a steady flow between inhales and exhales, but tactical breathing includes breath holds between every inhale and every exhale.  Here's how it goes: Take a deep breath in for a count of 4 seconds, hold your breath for 4 seconds, exhale for a count of 4 seconds, hold your breath for another 4 seconds, and then repeat. I'd recommend starting with some of the other breathing exercises I mentioned in order to improve your lung capacity before trying this. If you can't do counts of 4, start where you are comfortable and work your way up. Though the official method uses 4 second counts, there is nothing saying you can't try to increase the counts over time, just be careful that when doing the breath holds you don't start to feel dizzy, light headed, or panicked.  If done right and mastered over time, this practice can help slow your heart rate and decrease anxiety in moments of high stress.

In part 3, the final part of this series, I’ll be discussing 2 more advanced breathing techniques to add to your arsenal.  Until then, keep practicing your abdominal breathing and work on adding counting techniques to strengthen your breathing skills.  

 

Scott Fantucchio, LMHC

www.7cups.com/@ScottFantucchioLMHC

 

Tags:breathingmeditationanxiety