How do you know if you have ADHD?

6 Answers
Last Updated: 04/22/2019 at 10:57pm
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United States
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Lindsay Scheinerman, MA, LPC

Licensed Professional Counselor

My work with clients is to help them recognize and build on their strengths to find solutions for the conflicts presented in their lives.

Top Rated Answers
RoryBoutilierRPC
January 26th, 2017 1:54pm
In order to determine if you have ADHD you need formal assessment performed by a psychologist or psychiatrist. Although symptoms may be present, a person may not meet all criteria for ADHD; if this is the case, a wrong diagnosis can be detrimental. Symptoms of ADHD vary, but include: inability to focus, trouble concentrating, irritiability, poor academic performance despite average or above-average intelligence, fidgeting, and at times anger. These symptoms must be present for at least 6-12 months consistently, and be present in 3 or more areas of an individual's life, and cause significant distress for the person. If you think you may have ADHD, speak with a mental health professional or your family doctor for more information. Speaking with a professional, followed by testing and assessment, is the first step to learning more about ADHD.
SKCTID
March 20th, 2018 6:20am
There are a lot of tests online you can take to screen for ADHD but the only way to know for sure is to see a medical professional and get diagnosed. The problem with self-diagnosing is that so many mental illnesses can overlap each other so you could end up diagnosing yourself with ADHD when you really have OCD. The tests and screening tools are only effective when you bring the results to your doctor and disguise the results with them.
Nada
July 3rd, 2017 5:22pm
The best way to figure that out would be having a doctor appointment and checking up on that. However, these are some symptoms: The person might be disorganized, lacks focus, has a hard time paying attention to details and a tendency to make careless mistakes. Their work might be messy and seem careless. They have trouble staying on topic while talking, not listening to others, and not following social rules. They might be forgetful about daily activities (for example, missing appointments, forgetting to bring lunch). They might be easily distracted by things like trivial noises or events that are usually ignored by others. Fidget and squirm when seated. Gets up frequently to walk or run around. Has trouble playing quietly or doing quiet hobbies.
RumpleSteeleSkin
June 26th, 2017 4:50am
Well the only right answer to give you is to talk with your doctor on this. Then they can determine if you do or don't. Maybe you can write down some of the things you are experiencing and talk to them on this.
enthusiasticStrings5618
March 25th, 2018 1:09am
You can't focus no matter what and you're constantly hyper
bubblyFaith17
April 22nd, 2019 10:57pm
For me, I could not shut off my brain. If I were in a classroom setting, I would answer the question before the teacher even finished. I always found myself bored in school and didn't feel challenged. Concentration was so difficult because I was bored but if I went into one of my talented and gifted classes where I was challenged, I excelled greatly. These were symptoms I experienced as a teenager. Oh, and I also had sleep issues because I couldn't shut my brain off. As an adult, the sleeping issues and not being able to sleep because my mind would not shut off continued. If I did not have a set schedule, it would throw me completely off and throw me into a whirlwind of worry and obsessing over little thing. I would be extremely organized and then fall right back into being cluttered, unorganized and losing things like my purse or keys or a paper I needed. Only by seeing my psychiatrist was I tested for the first time in my life and the merry go round that i've been on has stopped.