How do I cope with anxiety attack s throughout the day?

9 Answers
Last Updated: 06/25/2019 at 4:53am
1 Tip to Feel Better
United States
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Brittany Kelley, MSW, LCSW

Clinical Social Work/Therapist

I am a psychodynamically trained clinical social worker. I find assisting women and families through difficult times an extremely rewarding and collaborative process.

Top Rated Answers
Anonymous
October 26th, 2016 12:23am
When I get an anxiety attack, if it's before I'm actually experiencing one I leave the room and just walk down the hall, to the bathroom, water fountain, or wherever to get away from whatever is that is giving me that feeling of an attack and try to focus on my breathing. If I'm experiencing an anxiety attack and can't do anything to try and prevent it I either go to the nurse or go into the bathroom with a friend who can help to calm me down. Hope this is helpful! :)
BeIiever
October 27th, 2016 1:09pm
Have you tried any grounding techniques, mindfulness, or meditation? I find when I'm having a panic attack, having someone talk me through some breathing exercises or doing them myself helps tremendously. Something I read in a book (don't remember what it was now) was that you can take life in short intervals that you know you can handle. Do you know you can handle 10, 15, or 30 minutes? Then get through the minutes you know you can, then realize that you can also get through the next 15 or so as well and the 15 after that and after that.
Fyn
March 6th, 2017 12:30am
Reassure yourself that what your feeling is simply a episode of anxiety. Remember that its going to be a bit uncomfortable for a while but nothing bad is going to happen. Just focus on positive thoughts and keep your breathing nice and steady. Don't be afraid just let the anxiety come and wash over you like a wave crashing on the beach.
BetterTogether101
November 20th, 2017 12:54pm
Anxiety attacks can be overwhelming to cope with alone at times, but the first thing you need to be able to set yourself down in a quiet area and contemplate the triggers that may arise during your day to day activities that can cause an anxiety attack. Once you are able to recognize the triggers and the development behind the attacks you can better come up with strategies to work for your individual situation depending on what the context is. For example if they are scenarios that you can avoid putting yourself in (if you are triggered by an elevator ride for instance and you know it will take you 15 extra minutes to take the stairs, then you account for that in your daily planning.) That is just one example and of course not every solution will work for every individual
AmethystUnicorn
February 6th, 2018 1:02pm
The way that I deal with anxiety attacks, I breath in and count 1-4, and breathe out counting 5-8 until I feel it is more manageable.
howrudoing
February 19th, 2018 2:05am
Try to think about the positive things going on in your life and the success you have achieved so far.
perishingros28
March 13th, 2018 8:49am
the best method that has worked for me is the 54321 coping method. Acknowledge FIVE things you see around you. It maybe a building or a bird or insect,etc. Acknowledge FOUR things you can touch around you. Maybe your hair, clothes, floor, etc. Acknowledge THREE things you hear. It could be birds chirping, water flowinig, clock ticking, etc. Acknowledge TWO things you can smell. Acknowledge ONE thing you can taste. I hope it helps.
Anonymous
March 26th, 2018 4:02am
You can cope with anxiety attack's throughout the day by taking deep breathes, going for a walk, or finding a activity that is distracting to focus on.
Anonymous
June 25th, 2019 4:53am
Panic disorder results from misinterpreting sensations linked with the fight-or-flight response as dangerous, which triggers an uncomfortable and often frightening barrage of symptoms - also known as a panic attack. Living in fear of having a panic attack and therefore avoiding situations that may cause them can often create more situations and more avoidance in a never-ending cycle of fear and anxiety. Although scary, panic attacks are harmless; they are the body's alarm system kicking in and are not designed to harm you in any way. While the response may make you feel as though you are going crazy or dying, you are not. Your body would have the same reaction if you were facing a physical threat, such as coming face to face with a bear. Once you understand what panic disorder is and why you are experiencing the symptoms, you can begin to learn to cope with them. The goal is not to eliminate the attacks, but to find a way to manage them without fear.