Skip to main content Skip to bottom nav

How do I overcome the fear of cashiers?

141 Answers
Last Updated: 10/31/2020 at 5:05pm
1 Tip to Feel Better
India
Moderated by

Jui Shankar, Ph.D

Psychologist

My worldview offers a systems perspective that values diverse clients and their struggles. I believe supportive and nonjudgmental therapeutic relationships empower clients.

Top Rated Answers
Anonymous
August 20th, 2016 2:08am
Try going with someone and having them purchase something, watch the transaction without ever having contact with the cashier. Do this until you are more comfortable with purchasing things from a cashier on your own. Also it would be great to be introduced to a cashier out of uniform. They are just normal people trying to earn a living.
Anonymous
August 20th, 2016 10:53pm
Think of the fact that they are human beings as well. When they greet you, say hi back and smile and thank them as well. You'll be surprised how easy it is if you've done it a few times!
Anonymous
September 1st, 2016 2:55pm
Think about all the people they see every single day. They don't care, you are just one of them even if you're behaving awkwardly.
bokchoi
September 3rd, 2016 12:54pm
practice making small talk with yourself. rehearse common replies to common small talk questions. You can use that if you're afraid of talking to them. If you're afraid of their judgement or something, remember that they serve hundreds of customers daily and often won't remember your face after you leave.
Anonymous
September 4th, 2016 4:56pm
You realize there's nothing to be afraid of and that you're strong and you can do it! It's okay ((:!
Bubbyduckie
September 9th, 2016 6:43pm
I've worked as a cashier for almost 3 years, and I can tell you, we're all very nice. Most of the time, we just want to keep to ourselves and do out job or ringing in what you're buying. Some cashiers can just tell when a person doesn't want to chat, but even just a hello is all you might get,
hippiehugs
September 9th, 2016 10:28pm
first of all, they're not there to harm you in any way, be aware of the fact that they don't pose any danger to you and they're just doing their job. you can talk as little as you please and when the cashier has finished scanning your stuff you can pack your purchases and leave. if you flash them a smile or say goodbye when you leave, they might do the same for you and both of you have a nicer day. remember that they're all just people, working and living their lives without expecting anything from you. no worries, you got this :)
GraceFaithAndSummer
September 10th, 2016 12:30am
Cashiers? First Of All Why are You Afraid? (Not Judging) Second, Cashier are usually (more often than not) very kind. Hang In There!
Anonymous
September 10th, 2016 1:32am
Overcoming your fears can be daunting. It is good to work with a specialist who can work with you to have better control of your phobia.
Anonymous
September 16th, 2016 8:34pm
Trying to distract myself as much as possible and going to them before I have a chance to second think
TheTripleS719
September 17th, 2016 7:34am
It's kind of like a child afraid of vacuums; the child didn't get over the fear until it was chased by a vacuum. I'd suggest going up to cashiers anyways, even if your fear makes you want to run from the store. You can't overcome a fear without confronting it head on.
Hayles0111
September 23rd, 2016 10:18pm
This sounds like social anxiety Which is a very hard thing to get over. It can take years and years of practice. But confidence and communication skills are key
Anonymous
September 25th, 2016 1:57pm
Well fearing anything doesnt help. Franklin roosevelt once said that you only have to fear your own fears. I had suggest you start by opening up and talking to your friends. If that doesnt help, take professional help. They help you to understand the reason behind your fears and suggest ways to overcome it through behavioural therapy. You will see positive results before you know and with your determination you ll emerge with flying colors.
gt17
September 28th, 2016 12:18am
I think the best way to overcome the fear of cashiers is to realize that they are nothing scary or monstrous, but that they are just another person! It also brings me some comfort to think that they will most likely forget about the entire experience in under five minutes :P
caringdaisy
September 30th, 2016 8:50pm
Is it a fear of talking to them or cashiers in general? If talking to them then it could be social anxiety. You could go to a therapist and get anxiety medication and work yourself through it.
Anonymous
October 2nd, 2016 4:31am
Work slowly on it. Help build up your own confidence until you realize there is nothing at all to fear.
Anonymous
October 9th, 2016 4:41pm
Cashiers are just another person with a job. And most of the time they don't really care, they're just working to get money and to them you're just another customer.
Anonymous
October 19th, 2016 8:59am
By interacting with them more, and noticing what about Cashiers specifically bother you? Is it just the transaction with money?
Anonymous
October 23rd, 2016 6:44am
You could make it easier at first, by bringing a friend along for example. Or, if you feel fearful in other social situations, work on them - it helps you overcome other more specific fears. Within time you may be able to go to a cashier by yourself, fighting the anxiety, till the fear starts to lessen.
tillyfee
November 11th, 2016 7:13pm
Just remember that cashiers are people, just like you. When I worked at a cinema I had to do shifts on the concessions tills and the box office. I was always nervous of serving people, even when I served 1000+ people a day. Cashiers are just normal people, with normal problems and normal perspectives. Don't be afraid.
Rosieee22
November 23rd, 2016 5:55pm
Just remember that they have to check out tons of customers everyday, and they probably are not judging you. If they do, they will likely forget about you as soon as they move on to the next customer. Other solutions include focusing on the products that you are buying and thinking about how badly you want them, and (although it may sound ridiculous) it's okay to be on your phone or be talking on the phone while the cashier is checking you out. This way, the cashier probably won't talk to you and will only focus on ringing up your items and getting paid.
Anonymous
December 23rd, 2016 3:31pm
I also had a fear of cashiers and suffered with major social anxiety. What helped me is the idea that, chashiers go through hundreds of people daily, they don't really notice our personal errors or shyness- some even understand. Its okay and the experience is usually short
Anonymous
January 26th, 2017 10:58am
Perhaps you could gradually work your way up to overcoming this fear. You could first go to a cashier with someone you know well and trust and gradually start to go on your own
UnderstandingFriend
February 26th, 2017 7:58pm
Remember that they are simply people just like you and just like your family/friends. They won't laugh at you if you fumble with your wallet, or give the wrong amount of money. They are simply doing their job and the last thing on their mind is judging you.
compassionateRiver45
March 8th, 2017 7:11am
Discover what it is you fear about them. Spend time near cashiers. Go shopping more often. Give yourself time to realise your fear and then perhaps beat it. You may realise you have nothing to be afraid of. You just need to put yourself in a situation where you can see.
bubblingForest49
March 8th, 2017 8:38pm
They see many people in a day, and their only job is to stand and scan. They won't judge you as they have seen so much in their time in the job. There is no need to be scared because they won't say anything and it is only a few minutes out of your day. The more you do it the less scared you will become.
OnechanCatbug
March 26th, 2017 6:28am
Overcoming the fear of cashiers is easy when you realize that they are just like you, and that they are not judging you for what you buy, since they've seen thousands buy the same product before. The experience can be quick and easy, don't feel pressured to have a conversation with them if you don't want to!
airreeekuh
April 15th, 2017 5:02pm
I knoooow how you feel! For me, I would memorize whatever I need to order and if I mess that up, I just like to think that the cashier probably wouldn't mind and would forget about it as soon as they get past me because they have a bunch more customers to deal with rather than my messing up.
Sofia76
April 21st, 2017 6:22pm
For overcoming fears you have to expose yourself to that what you are afraid of. The best thing is doing it gradually. Set a list of things you are afraid of and do a scale according your level of fear. Try the easiest things first and move forward. You have to be prepare to accept the symptoms of fear and recognise them just as symptoms which come and go. Step by step you will manage better the situations you are afraid of
gracefulCloud45
April 26th, 2017 10:14pm
No worries, you'll be fine. Last summer I also worked as a cashier. I was freaking terrified that the cash did not balance, gave wrong exchanged money, did not give the best service, the list went on….. (I easily panick) The first day was honestly horrible (I hope yours would be fine) as I thought the cash didn't balance and I called the supervisor. But the next day was just fine, even though I still made small mistakes. It doesn't matter how old you are as long as you do your job well. Back then my coworkers was still in high school and even if she did wrong, we forgave her as everyone makes mistakes. I am also terrible at math but again, no worries. Learning by doing. That's what I did. I tried to memorize some math that I found hard. Get yourself a small calculator (just in case if someday you're panic and forget how to count. Hey! That's really possible, right?!) And for your shyness, you'll also learning by doing. You'll learn that you have to greet everyone (even if they're not your customers, they're kids or coworkers). Because in the future, it is extremely important to be friendly every where. (I am still improving this skill) Remember to calm down. You'll fine.