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Is there a midpoint between normal eating and anorexia?

17 Answers
Last Updated: 09/15/2020 at 2:35pm
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Top Rated Answers
Miracle
February 15th, 2015 2:36pm
Yes I believe there is. Many people have restrictive diets or maintain a weight that is less than their ideal healthy body weight for reasons other than psychological disorders. For example those involved in competative gymnastics. In addition to this many people in this midpoint could be in recovery from a restrictive eating disorder or in the process of developing one but do not yet meet the full criteria for anorexia. If your eating habits are impacting on either your physical or mental health/emotional state it is worth speaking to a healthcare provider because 'normal' is so subjective and if there are any issues despite how serious/ non serious you feel they are its worth investigating because seeking help is often the first step to a more fufilled life.
waterfakeplants
January 25th, 2016 11:43pm
I believe so yes. As a former eating disorder sufferer one of my symptoms was restricting food and eating very little but i was not anorexic.
Anonymous
April 4th, 2015 3:57am
Yes, it is typically referred to as ENDOS. However, anorexic tendencies are just as significant as anorexia.
Nikki11
April 25th, 2015 4:48pm
I believe that once you begin restricting that it is a sign that your eating habits are gearing towards anorexia. Even if your restricting isn't as "Severe" in the beginning it can become an addiction that you can't stop.
Anonymous
July 21st, 2015 8:35pm
Anorexia is a clinical term for the eating disorder 'anorexia nervosa'. There is not really a 'midpoint' between normal eating and anorexia, i.e., there is no 'I'm halfway to anorexia.' Anorexia is the name for a cluster of symptoms related to problematic eating behaviors. There is treatment and help available for people struggling with anorexia; if you or someone you know is struggling with an eating disorder do not hesitate to reach out to a mental health professional or talk to a trained listener here on 7 Cups.
Anonymous
July 28th, 2015 4:10am
EDNOS: Eating Disorder Not Otherwise Specified. This is for sufferers of anorexia, binging or bulimia like symptoms or a combination of eating disorders. Sufferers do not fulfil the strict criteria for other eating disorders and may not seem to lose or gain much weight but the psychological effects are very real.
cardioneurgeon
August 18th, 2015 12:14pm
There is no midpoint. Everyone has different eating requirements that vary day by day. Anorexia, however also involves an element of psychological fear, the fear of gaining weight. Normal eating is not so much concerned.
MarianaFilipaSouza6
August 19th, 2015 3:10pm
Well, I guess it's relative. The "normal eating" can depend on your physical activity, your physical condition and all that kind of stuff.
MemoriesOfLife
November 9th, 2015 8:32pm
I believe there is one, there is always a transition from eating healthily to becoming an anorexic, it doesn't happen over night. This is the point where you start trying out slowly what anorexia is, maybe when your eating habits start to change so you begin eating less and less, or maybe go on brutal diets for two days straight. This is also the point where is easier to return and turn your back to anorexia, so if you may believe you are in this point is of vital importance that you seek out for help because your still in time to prevent anorexia and making the anorexia detox process a lot more easier.
William0
November 10th, 2015 10:53am
Well, having this question in mind immediately raises meaning questions, dieting can be a midpoint and purpose and reason are also a major factor in decision making. Anorexia is not something which can really be considered abnormal to the individual involved, it is simply what we want. Often times it is best to affirm slow integration of food into what may be considered normal. Most people know the calories they want to intake, so if I had to label a median, I would say about 1000 calories is a healthy midpoint as long as all the vitamin requirements are being met. Of course this is a median to be used in transition into something else.
Anonymous
January 25th, 2016 3:51pm
Yes, but it's not a very healthy midpoint. See, a person can have all sorts of eating behaviors that don't fall into either starvation, binge-purge, binge, etc. or normal. Many patients with eating disorders have certain behaviors such as eating while feeling good, not when feeling bad. In short, yes, there is a middle ground.
Anonymous
January 26th, 2016 11:30pm
If you're not eating normally but it is not as severe enough to be categorized as anorexia , then i think you fall into the category EDNOS (eating disorders not otherwise specified) or just disordered eating. But even so, you should still seek medical treatment as disordered eating is a sign of unresolved feelings and negative associations with food .
EllaLoves
February 8th, 2016 4:06am
Yes, and this can be found online as well as by speaking to a doctor. You need to be in your BMI based on height and weight.
Kimberley28
May 9th, 2016 1:12pm
Yes I believe there is. Many people have restrictive diets or maintain a weight that is less than their ideal healthy body weight for reasons other than psychological disorders. For example those involved in competative gymnastics. In addition to this many people in this midpoint could be in recovery from a restrictive eating disorder or in the process of developing one but do not yet meet the full criteria for anorexia. If your eating habits are impacting on either your physical or mental health/emotional state it is worth speaking to a healthcare provider because 'normal' is so subjective and if there are any issues despite how serious/ non serious you feel they are its worth investigating because seeking help is often the first step to a more fufilled life.
calmZebra60
February 14th, 2017 5:54pm
Yes, actually! It's complex and often misunderstood, but there is a thing known as disordered eating. Essentially, you are in between an ED and normal, healthy habits. Ths involves, in transitioning to anorexia, things such as compulsive exercise, paying more attention to calories, warped self-perception.
softNutella25
March 19th, 2018 9:04pm
Not sure what you mean by "midpoint"; there's the normal range of nutrition, and the abnormal range. If you're intentionally choosing to avoid nutrition to lose weight and it's affecting your health negatively, it may be time to consult a doctor.
gentleSun78
September 15th, 2020 2:35pm
Yes, there is a line, midpoint which separates normal eating from anorexia. Professionals (psychiatrists from field of eating disorders, etc) know where this line is and they can diagnose you properly. But even they can have troubles setting correct diagnose as some symptoms can be very vague or/and can be integral in many different disorders/illnesses, and so, diferential diagnosis is needed too before diagnosis is set by them for certain. Correct diagnosis is needed for correct treatment. You can't give yourself diagnosis as no one can diagnose self. But for sure, this midpoint between normal eating and anorexia (and any other eating disorders) exist.