How do I maintain good sleeping habits if I work in shifts (day/afternoon/night)?

9 Answers
Last Updated: 11/12/2018 at 4:45pm
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Top Rated Answers
wonderfulMagic99
January 26th, 2015 10:19pm
I only had to do this short term, and there were a few things I found that helped, but I didn't perfect it. Keeping up a bedtime routine, having a dark room, and putting on some music softly and shutting doors to reduce noise during the day made it easier.
wevegotthis
June 1st, 2015 4:53am
Stay on track with a sleep schedule. It's most important to go to bed at the same time and wake at the same time so your body can reliably produce the chemicals it should.
JinkzKitty
June 10th, 2015 7:49pm
Building a routine is the best way that I find to work shifts. If you train your body to feel sleepy and fall asleep after certain things it will always do that if you continue it. Sometimes simple things like have a glass of water, brush your teeth and then curl up with your book can be all it takes to get you started.
Anonymous
November 16th, 2015 5:54am
The adult body needs 4-8 hours of sleep to function. Whether this means small naps throughout the day, or prioritizing sleep over a night out with friends, you need to find the amount of time your body needs to feel healthy.
Anonymous
July 19th, 2016 8:57pm
Try and find a regular time in the day/night when your not working and try keeping to those times or just maybe try and sleep or have naps when ever you do have the time.
Here2HelpYouThrough
April 25th, 2017 4:17am
Coming from someone who works swing shifts I know how hard this can be. My greatest advice is, no matter what schedule you are working try to stay with a pattern of sleep. Don't stray from that. The more your body gets in the habit of going to sleep at specified times, the better.
Anonymous
May 16th, 2017 9:32pm
You should make sure to establish a sleeping schedule that you can adhere to - going to sleep at about the same time every day, and waking up at about the same time. You should eliminate daytime light sources during the day - close the blinds, and try to make the bedroom as close to feeling like night time as possible. Try to speak to family members or roommates about respecting the time you need to sleep so they can avoid making too much noise so you don't wake up. It can help to buy disposable earplugs as well, and a sleeping mask which can help remove the light which can negatively affect your sleep habits.
ClassicZara
March 26th, 2018 6:40pm
Take naps when off shift and come back with a attitude that is ready to support those in need.
ParoxysmsJulie
November 12th, 2018 4:45pm
Try to set time aside to get some rest, it's recommended that you sleep up to 6-8 hours a day but of course that doesn't work for everyone. If possible, try to request for a more consistent schedule regardless of the time. If it calls for it, talk to a sleep specialist about it and see if there is any alternative. Asides from that, make sure your bed is only used for sleeping / sex, put your phone away at least 30 min - an hour before you sleep (turn on night shift), drink water or some chamomile tea, and turn the thermostat to a lower temperature (unless it's already cold) so your covers feel a lot warmer. If you find it difficult to fall asleep, set a time for you take melatonin. Typically, you should take melatonin 10-30 minutes before your bedtime so your body can metabolize it so if you plan on sleeping at 1, take it at 12:30. But as long as you keep it consistent, it may take a while for your body to adjust but once it does, your sleep should improve.