How can I support my coworker or friend who is losing their job?

18 Answers
Last Updated: 12/05/2017 at 2:14pm
1 Tip to Feel Better
United States
Moderated by

Lisa Groesz, PhD

Psychologist

With evidenced based therapies, we find the root of the problem together to implement solutions. We all face crises, transitions, or disorders at some time.

Top Rated Answers
Chandra23
September 11th, 2014 10:58pm
you can listen to her, show her some empathy and help her make a decision to retrain or find a new job. be supportive and do not criticize her and do not try to find menial jobs for her. let her find a job on her own . Also be there for her when she needs her.
cocod84
September 21st, 2014 6:32pm
I recently had a friend who had just found out that they were being laid off from their job. The best advice i could give for supporting someone in this situation is to just be as positive as possible! Reassure your friend or coworker that they will overcome this eventually. Having to get back out there and job hunt can be super overwhelming but it helps when you have someone to talk to who is positive and encouraging to help motivate you to get back out there!
JollyClaret
September 12th, 2014 1:07pm
First tell them that they are not alone in this struggle and you are there to support them in anyway you can. Next ask them why they feel they lost their job, and say they should write the reasons down as goals to improve on in the future. Tell them that when one door closes multiple open and you will help them get back on their feet :)
Jedda - Expert in Work Stress
October 30th, 2014 1:27am
Offer to keep in contact with them, talk to them, give them any support they need, go for lunch with them, help them talk to the boss about their job if needed and help try to get the their job back.
Yahantei
November 3rd, 2014 3:40pm
Sometimes the best thing you can do is listen to them and practice some active listening as outlined by the guides on 7cupsoftea. Ask questions about how they are feeling and reflect back at them what they are saying by summarizing their feelings and thoughts (ex: "sounds like things have been really stressful at work, and you are worried that your performance hasn't been that great lately. You must feel frustrated.") Try not to give them advice, instead try and let work things out with you as a board to bounce ideas off of.
Uniqueg
November 19th, 2014 6:05am
Just try to be there for your friend through every step, maybe you can help your friend look at new jobs and opportunities
guyinasuit
December 18th, 2014 2:12pm
Tell them that there will always be other job opportunities. Keep working at finding one, and be there for them.
Anonymous
December 24th, 2014 4:58am
Express empathy by listening actively. Help her feel your support and faith in his or her future success.
Anonymous
January 4th, 2015 12:47am
Make them dinner. Let them know if you see openings elsewhere (but don't be too pushy about it it). Listen to them and let them vent. Don't talk about their job situation much unless they want to. It sucks to be constantly reminded even when it's well meant.
Soulreallymatterstome
March 25th, 2015 1:53pm
I am a believer that things like this happen for a reason. We are here with purpose and when life switches lanes on us, its because we are needed on a different road. We are born with purpose and fulfill that a day at a time. Kind words, deeds and actions propel us forward to achieve what we are here to do. Not everyone shares this belief so I would support my coworker or friend simply by listening and sending silent blessings. I would support them with their feelings especially if they are losing power through low self esteem or worthlessness. It's especially hard when we think life 'happens' to us so I would do what I could to encourage them to take back their power and turn what may seem to be the worst thing in the world into a positive. Somehow we all make it through challenging times, we need to grow better from these experiences not bitter.
ErictheRed7
June 17th, 2015 2:47am
By showing support, discussing possible alternatives, and endorsing his/her profile to other people from my network.
AuroraMoonieLunette
July 6th, 2015 3:16am
You can remind him or her that you're always there for them. You can also be their number one job scout! Help them get ready for interviews, find great job leads, etc.!
WarmComfort
October 26th, 2015 10:41am
I could support my friend by being there to listen in on what he is going through during this sad period. I would be supportive in highlighting how he feels, what he could have done and most importantly, he's identity with the job.
TiffanyK
November 9th, 2015 2:10am
The best way to support them is to be a good friend and let them know that you are there for them no matter what happens and that everything is going to be ok.
serene63
March 15th, 2016 10:10pm
the only way to support them is to be there try be the shoulder for them to cry on push them to try another job to move on
Anonymous
February 28th, 2017 12:57am
Let your coworker or friend know that you are there to support them. Sometimes that is a huge help in itself: just knowing that someone cares about you. Other ways you can offer support is by offering to be a reference for them, offering to write a letter about their performance if you worked with them, offering to help them look for job listings, or what other kind of support they may need. "Hey, I'm here for you. Let me know if you need a reference or help finding job listings or if you need a hug." You're a good friend.
genuineComfort75
September 26th, 2017 2:35am
You can support your coworker or friend that's losing their job by just being there for them. It can be hard when something that life changing happens. It helps so much to have someone by your side to have an open ear for them to vent and have that relief while going through that difficult time.
Anonymous
December 5th, 2017 2:14pm
By being understanding of them, and just being there for them, so many people are going to have to stop themselves from judging your out of work friend, they are going to need all the support they can get right now, and the reassurance that their worth is not determined by their net income.