How do I tell my boss I'm leaving? (nicely)?

155 Answers
Last Updated: 02/10/2020 at 10:38am
1 Tip to Feel Better
United States
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Clinical Social Work/Therapist

I believe that problems are separate from the person having them and that our own stories and how we look at our own stories directly influences how we perceive those problems

Top Rated Answers
Anonymous
February 3rd, 2018 3:55am
Have a private talk with your boss. Tell them the good about the job first and then slowly talking into the topic. Talk about your future plan and how you planning on that.
ShaynaRae
February 5th, 2018 8:35am
Remember that your boss has their own career journey and has left positions too. You don't need to go into detail. For example, I quit my last job by saying a better opportunity came along that I felt would help increase my skills. I thanked them for all of their guidance and for the experience and wished them well.
PosiPotato
February 12th, 2018 6:27am
Write a professionally written letter of resignation and include thanking your boss for the opportunity.
Anonymous
February 17th, 2018 4:49pm
You can do a letter that says your leaving your job and date it 2 weeks out so that way you get a better review on your job skills
PrettyCupcake00
March 1st, 2018 6:42am
Hey love! You should hand him a resignation letter and whiling giving it to him politely make him understand the reason behind you quitting.
Anonymous
March 31st, 2018 8:53pm
Definitely write it down, or sit down with them. Be sure to thank them for the opportunity to work for them. It will help in the long run.
1musicloverever
May 12th, 2018 7:18am
You send in your two weeks notice and simply explain to them truthfully of why you are wanting to leave. They might try to cut you a deal of making it better suited for you to stay, or they will accept and understand your polite recognition and arrange the last two weeks for you.
SundancerPipeholder
May 19th, 2018 2:10am
I have been through this many times, every time I told my boss I had another job they gave me more money. Explain to them you have another opertuinty for more m9ney and advancement, no hard feelings. Never burn a bridge you may need that bridge later
SupportiveSockMonkey
May 20th, 2018 4:37pm
This should be through handing in your notice, usually this will have a reason in the middle of it. It can be difficult to have this conversation depending on the relationship you have with the boss. An example of a notice of leave would be Dear ____ (name) I regret to inform you that I am handing in my resignation. I hereby give my intention to leave your company. I made this decision because... (give reason) If there is any further information you'd like to know or anything I can do to help please let me know. Thank you, Yours sincerely (name and signature) If you are on a contract there is a month notice needing to be given, if you are not it is usually 7 days.
calmSeal32
May 29th, 2018 11:51pm
Hi sir something came beyond my control, I would like to leave 2 hours early. if it is ok I would rally appreciate it
KurtCups711
June 16th, 2018 2:24pm
Get straight to the point. "Dear [Boss], thank you for the opportunity and experiences [company] has given me during my tenure. Please accept my two week notice of resignation." Remember that you don't owe them anything.
Anonymous
June 28th, 2018 11:22am
I am leaving. Good bye and call me if you need me for anything. You have been wonderful but I need to see the world.
OneBeathAtATime
July 1st, 2018 8:08am
Tell them (even if you don't mean it entirely) that you appreciate the opportunity and experience it gave you. Give a 2 week notice if possible. If you really love the job you're in but things are not quite nice there (atmosphere), maybe ask and give feedback of how it could get better.
Kat140615xx
July 11th, 2018 10:43pm
Ask for a one to one with your manager at work, Nicely put it why you are wanting to leave, Hand in your notice with a set amount if leaving time for the manager to find a replacement.
slavont
July 14th, 2018 2:09am
The best thing to do is to put in a 2-week notice that you are quitting your job, that's the most professional way of doing so.
Anonymous
July 29th, 2018 5:10am
Be very polite when you tell him that you want to talk to him, then bring up your excuse about leaving.
Anonymous
August 2nd, 2018 4:56pm
Some companies have different policies. Usually you have to hand in a notice letter to explain that you are leaving and then you work a notice period (usually about four weeks,) you can also have a conversation with your boss. Just be honest, speaking to them about it is the best thing you can do, it's much more polite.
bouncyCandy44
August 3rd, 2018 9:24pm
I just went through this! Ask to speak to them privately, say how much the company means to you but then that you're putting in your 2 weeks notice.
Anonymous
August 12th, 2018 10:58am
I have learnt a lot from all my colleagues here and appreciate your leadership and support in helping me grow in my career. The time has come for me to pursue my interests in other areas, and I am sad to let you know that I have to leave you all.
endearingWaves15
November 11th, 2018 2:55pm
Rule number one: never burn bridges. If you are leaving your for a better endeavor, do the right thing and give a proper notice. Write a resignation letter and hand-deliver it, on nice paper. There are many resources online that will help you craft a proper resignation letter. I've even seen people that have put their resignation letter on a cake and delivered it to their higher-ups! The important thing is that you don't burn the bridge and you leave the right way. Now, if you're just telling your boss that you're leaving for the day, simply clean up your work area and say "I'm leaving for the day. Have a good night." Firm, concise, and polite!
Hpkawal
January 16th, 2019 11:00pm
Thank you for giving me the opportunity to learn the many skills that I have learnt with the organization. These skills will be with me forever and being treated by my boss with compassion and kindness will never be forgotten. I am sorry to say that as this is my resignation letter to you and I moving advancing within my job field. Thank you for giving me the opportunity to work with such a caring organization that has allowed me skills to grow and also attain new skills that are needed to be successful, thank you once again.
Favor2020
February 8th, 2019 5:40pm
Well, my friend first of all thank your boss for giving you the opportunity to work for them. And you are very appreciated for the time that you have been there and everything you have learned from there organization. Say something like it sadden you that you have to leave. But, a better situation have come up or you can say something like you have been looking for the opportunity to work in this field for a good while and it has finally come available. You're giving your two week notice to inform them that you will officially be leaving at the time of your two weeks ending. Once again I just want to say thank you for all you have done for me.
LovelyRose77
February 16th, 2019 5:54am
It's always important to show respect to your boss and co-workers, even if your boss wasn't respectful towards you. How you treat others is a reflection on your attitude, not their treatment of you. Trust in yourself that you are strong enough to leave your job with your head held high because you acted respectfully and responsibly. Ask for a personal one on one meeting to discuss your reasons for leaving. Be honest, but be professional and respectful. Thank your boss for any advice and direction they gave you during your career. Tell them about a time when they supported you or helped move your career forward. Thank them for their support, and tell them that you will take those skills into your next job with great appreciation. Lastly, always give a 2 weeks written notice, or the required amount of leave notice for your job.
jade2019
February 17th, 2019 8:43am
Explain an opportunity has been presented, that would better your career. I would compliment your boss/co-workers and the company, and say how grateful you were for the opportunity they originally gave you. I would go on to say how much you have learned from them, and any admirable qualities your boss has shown you. Thank them for anything they may have taught you. Ask your boss what they think you could work on, and what you already do well (engage them and appeal to there egos). Make sure you adhere to notice time in your contract before leaving. This should encourage your boss to give you a good detailed reference.
Pinealcoaching
June 5th, 2019 8:23pm
Tell him politely that you are looking for more fulfillment and improving your career and you have come across an opportunity which will help you achieve that . At the same time tell your boss that working in present company and specially under his leadership had a wonderful affect on you and had helped you to gaunt knowledge and courage to look for more challenging opportunities for your growth. Tell him that you will always be grateful to him and the present company for the opportunities provided to you. You can also tell him that you may one day like to join back and work with him again
Anonymous
July 3rd, 2019 8:31am
While you appreciate all of the opportunities you received working with them, you’ve decided to move forward with you career path. Thank them for everything they’ve done done and any lessons/skills you learned under their supervision, but reinforce the fact that you feel that you need to move on from this job to further better yourself as a working professional. Or that the interest of the company have grown far different than your own as time has passed. Each situation is different and it honestly depends on why you’re leaving. Just remember to be courteous, but ultimately to the point.
Anonymous
July 17th, 2019 6:00pm
Well in my opinion you can say that I have learned a lot in here and gained enough skills but I don't see myself growing any further in the current company. So I am looking out for new opportunities which would bring more challenge and will encourage me to learn more and flourish. Its been great being part of this company and have some beautiful memories, which I will never forget, which made me what I am today. So yeah in my opinion something like that will be NICE enough. Also if possible arranging a get together with your colleges and boss will be a mark of professionalism.
Brilliantsmile94
July 18th, 2019 5:53pm
This was one of my difficulties too, lol. So, I just said I'm leaving explaining the reason, in a warm way, not being cold. You are not obligated to remain there If you don't want to. Look for the right moment, say "I want to talk as soon as possible with you", and you two talk. Warmly, nicely... Being direct is the first step. Don't be afraid, what's the worst can happen? What are you afraid of? Well, no one want to hurts someone else's feelings, but you have to have self respect too, do whatever makes you happy, never feel obligated about anything.
amiableSun7287
July 21st, 2019 2:37pm
Of course, this would depend on the relationship you have with your boss- a closer relationship might have more casual wording and specifics, while one that is more distant might be more generic and formal: Hi [Boss' name], I want to let you know that I've decided to resign from [position] to pursue a new opportunity. I appreciate the experience and learning I've gained while working at [workplace], but feel it's time for me to move in a different direction. I wish the best for you and [team/company/initiative/etc.] going forward. I am intending my last day to be [date]. Happy to discuss more in person/Thank you again for the opportunity to be a part of [team/workplace] [Signature]
MrsAshleyMarie
August 8th, 2019 11:02pm
Being honest and professional is the nicest way to leave an employer. The truth is, people leave jobs all the time, so this isn't something new for you boss. He's/she's probably had 10s or 100s of people give him/her their resignation. Be honest about why you are leaving, and give them at least a 2 week notice. If your employer was pleasant to work for, be sure to thank them and acknowledge them for that. I know it can be hard and awkward to give your boss your resignation, but it helps to know that it happens frequently, and it's pretty unlikely that your employer will take it personally.