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What is the best way to manage when your work place becomes aware of your anxiety issues?

9 Answers
Last Updated: 03/24/2020 at 9:38pm
1 Tip to Feel Better
United States
Moderated by

Deane Rain Marie, LMFT

Marriage & Family Therapist

I take a holistic approach in working with eating disorders, mood disorders, relationships, and the LGBTQ community. I use EMDR, Dreamwork, Stories, CBT and Cinema therapy.

Top Rated Answers
Anonymous
January 25th, 2015 6:45pm
In my own experience, this can actually be a good thing, because it has pushed me towards living more honestly and building my support network. I identified who at my work needed to know more information, and then met with them as a group to share about my anxiety, what an anxiety attack might look like, and what is and is not helpful in that situation. All my coworkers were very open and supportive. This conversation is one I had avoided, but it was actually a blessing, because it helped me feel safer and less like I have to pretend that everything is okay if I am experiencing high level anxiety. In those moments, my coworkers have enough background information to be able to respond in a way that helps instead of making the situation worse. If disability accommodations would help you do your job and manage your anxiety, then HR is the place to go to start that conversation. Possible accommodations might be a private room that you can go to, flexible work hours for doctor appointments, even being able to have a psychiatric service dog at work with you.
Amaria
April 13th, 2015 10:55am
be honest. Explain it to a higher up when you feel calmer. Always ask for short breaks so you can calm
LawrenceChamberlain
May 25th, 2015 11:45pm
Honesty will take you a long way. Additionally, work is not or should not be the pivotal place of your life. If your colleagues and superiors do not trust you any more or even worse, mock you, leave the place and try to find a remedy, e.g. find out about the source of your anxiety
Peacefulmeditation
August 21st, 2015 9:38pm
Exert your confidence. Before going to work decompress the best you can with relaxation techniques. Then focus your mind to one task at a time.
Greatlistener87
November 8th, 2015 2:24pm
Its good to inform your office of your health issues that you are facing so that they can cater if anything were to happen.
Anonymous
January 19th, 2016 5:22pm
You need to think about yourself in this situation and not others Anxiety is something you can't control so don't be ashamed of it and try to educat them about it if can .
Anonymous
January 20th, 2016 7:13am
Take this to your advantage - this means you'll be able to get the help you need when necessary, there will no longer be any need to pretend that you're okay. If people ask questions, use that opportunity to educate them and break the stigma. Anxiety isn't something people should frown upon.
SilentSerenityy
July 11th, 2016 1:53pm
It can be beneficial when your work place are aware of your anxiety. It might feel a little awkward that people know but embrace it as a big support system for you. Your coworkers likely have anxiety themselves so they understand and sympathise with you.
Anonymous
March 24th, 2020 9:38pm
In my experience, making other people aware of your anxiety can massively help, as someone else might suffer with anxiety similar to you. Making people aware of your anxiety means they can offer you help and support when needed and can give them a better understanding on how to help and make things easier for you at work. This helps in feeling less alone when you lighten the load by talking and sharing your experiences. You could end up helping someone else at the same time by speaking out about the things that affect you and how you have learnt to cope with effects of anxiety.