I feel guilt and regret after I eat anything substantial. How can I remove remorse from my diet?

12 Answers
Last Updated: 12/03/2017 at 3:34pm
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Top Rated Answers
LittleLionManJake
March 13th, 2017 10:34pm
The best thing you can do, in my personal experience, to help remove some guilt around food is to realise that 1- food is merely fuel to keep our bodies going- our bodies dont care what form that fuel comes in, be it all at once or spread over the day or a mix of both, our bodies are just thankful that they have fuel to carry out its daily tasks such as keeping us healthy and helping us do everything we want to do with our lives- and, 2- you're worthy of that fuel, again, no matter its source- you're just as worthy as anyone else, and if you wouldn't deprive a loved one of substantial food, then you should never deprive yourself of the same
Anonymous
January 24th, 2015 10:15pm
Personally, I would recommend talking to a professional that specializes in eating disorders, because remorse in diet can lead to anorexia or bulimia.
RedCervus
April 20th, 2015 11:30am
Eating is important, in order to give your body the energy that you need to be happy, and live a fulfilling, higher quality life, you need to consume. If you feel guilt and regret after eating a substantial meal, it may be worth looking into some positive coping strategies, such as distraction techniques, that will take your mind off food, and body image, in the immediate moment. Changing thoughts and feelings about food and your body can take time, so focus on the immediate emotions of guilt and regret, and work towards a better thought process in the long term.
Anonymous
May 18th, 2015 8:37pm
These feelings are common in people suffering from eating disorders. Acceptance of our thoughts, feelings and our behavior can help us act in less judgmental way towards ourselves and can help establish basis from where we can work further towards recovering. Being able to acknowledge that our feelings, thoughts and behavior are valid and understandable given our circumstances, no matter how uncomfortable or unwelcome we might feel towards them, can sometimes be a good goal to set for ourselves. We can try to work at comfortable pace towards accomplishing it, before taking other steps that might require us to challenge our automatic thoughts, feelings and patterns of behavior. A path towards recovery can be a challenging one, but seeking support and making use of different tools that we can make useful on our journey can help greatly. Some of people we can seek help/support from, and who can help us find most suitable tools for our recovery are psychotherapists and dietitians. Some of the psychotherapy approaches that are considered helpful with EDs are Cognitive Behavioral Therapy and Dialectical Behavioral Therapy.
fraunow85
June 14th, 2015 11:24am
I found viewing food as fuel particularly helpful. Human bodies can't run on fumes forever. Sometimes the more substantial the food, the healthier it is for one to eat.
Anonymous
December 3rd, 2017 3:34pm
I think telling yourself that you are providing your body with fuel and nutrients. It hard to understand now because of the distorted eating patterens or your view towards food,but you will eventually start mentally rationalizing that your well being will change and your thoughts towards food will change too.
PriscilaOrellana
January 25th, 2015 2:11am
Everybody deserves to be happy no matter how can be your body or heart, we are beautiful in the way we are. Diet is for be healthy not skinny; it's all about eat moderatly.
Sunshine009
June 9th, 2015 3:11am
It takes a lot of work to completely remove it, however it might help you to try eating extremely healthy meals with lots of fruits and veggies. It would be high in protein and vitamins which would give you what you need, but it would also be good for you and you wouldn't have to worry too much about quantity of your food. Hope this helps you!
TheComedyTragedy
July 21st, 2015 10:38am
That's a difficult one. I don't think guilt went away for me for a long time, I just ate through the guilt and told myself that though I felt guilt, the guilt wasn't right and didn't define me - so I did it despite the guilt.
Brook
November 10th, 2015 8:31am
The best way is to just remind yourself that your self worth is so much more than the food you eat and the calories consumed. I know that it is way easier said then done but just trying and not giving up is really important and remembering that it is okay to have some bad days.
NoImaginationY
November 12th, 2015 2:52pm
Not feeling guilty about eating can be difficult and a long process. You can always take steps to manage the situation though. It's likely that it will feel unnatural in the beginning, but an easy first step is reminding yourself that you need the nutrients and that it's not something that will make you gain. Starting getting meals of "safe foods" can also be helpful, since it takes off some of the pressure. You can get little by little used to larger portions, without panicking and triggering restriction again.
4thepeople20
February 8th, 2016 6:30pm
Organic foods make a great alternative to just regular nutrition. Fresh fruits and veggies, limit processed foods, etc. Going organic may help you feel better about eating and you will still get the nutrients your body needs.