Should a parent tell their depressed and suicidal child about their past as a depressed teen?

18 Answers
Last Updated: 05/15/2018 at 12:43pm
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Top Rated Answers
mayraishere
February 2nd, 2015 12:45am
I think it would be good for both. Sharing the (common) pain can create a stronger connection between parents and their kids, and it would show their kids that, if they came around this, they can do it, too.
heartfulmusings89
February 19th, 2015 4:27pm
I believe so. I think it's important to address these issues with your child while they are growing up. Because if a parent went through the same thing that their child is going through, then they are the ones that should be able to empathize the most with their kid. And, by telling your child what your experiences were, it also lets them know that they aren't alone in this and that it can get better.
positivelymia84
June 5th, 2015 6:12am
I think communication is very vital in a parent-child relationship. Children can always look up to their parents especially if the parent has experienced depression but has overcome it. Talking to the child who is suicidal, she/he will be able to get some tips or advise on how she could overcome depression.
Anonymous
June 6th, 2015 11:52am
Absolutely! To know that the parent struggled with the same thing will give the child hope that things can be better in the future. The child will also feel more connected because he now knows you have shared in the same struggle.
helper2319
May 8th, 2015 5:48am
I thing so. If a parent can truly conect with their child on a truly important subject like this, they might save their chils' s life.
Anonymous - Expert in Parenting
May 14th, 2015 7:17pm
It could help. It could be used in a way to connect with the child and make them realize that they can overcome what is depressing them. Be there for them.
Anonymous
July 7th, 2015 1:20am
Yes, because sometimes your past and how you got through it can help your child overcome there problem if they know you can relate to them in some way
ClaireyMarie
July 21st, 2015 2:21am
Sure, only to relate to them and let them know that they understand, and to say that things can get better It is no good when a parent does it in comparison though, or in a way to tell that child that they had it worse than their kid. I don't feel that's right, because everyone has their known limit to depression, and any amount is bad and a struggle, it doesn't matter if anyone has had it worse.
MegEliza
July 30th, 2015 12:29am
Absolutely! It's a great way to help the child and parent connect and the child will likely feel more comfortable talking about their own issues with a parent that they know understands.
PoliteOcean
September 21st, 2015 4:32am
They may be able to help their child in the way of letting them know that they understand what they are going through. And should do what they can to help. The next step should be to seek help through a professional like doctor, counselor or therapist to help with the rest.
Fitrandi
November 4th, 2015 5:15am
Often, suicidal and depressed individual do not always know where or to whom to turn to. They might even feel ashamed or to shy to tell anyone about their feelings. Knowing that someone close to them has lived a similar experience can be very helpful to start a discussion on the subject and open up. It can also be an opportunity to create a connection that will help them in the situation. It's also an opportunity to let them know that hey you are there for them and believe them. I hope this helps, and good luck to you!
HelpWisely
April 11th, 2016 9:15am
No. Telling them of your past experience with depression is never going to make things better or help the child overcome or cope with his or her own depression or suicidal tendencies.
Anonymous
April 17th, 2016 1:51am
Yes you should. It can help to know how your parent dealt with it.
Anonymous
April 19th, 2016 8:33am
Sure they should.. And tell them how you dealt with your depression and how far you've come out of depression
Clouder
April 24th, 2016 7:30am
This really depends on the relationship between parent and child and the unique circumstances of the situation. If it goes badly, it could end up making the child feel as if the parent is making it all about them, or the child might misunderstand and assume that they're 'doomed' by genetics to have a mental illness. If it goes well, it could help the child feel less alone and a more hopeful about what the future holds. If things are severe enough that the child is suicidal, it's probably best to get professional support. Perhaps the parent could share with the child with a family counsellor's guidance.
EmeraldRocks
January 31st, 2017 5:04am
I think communication is very vital in a parent-child relationship. Children can always look up to their parents especially if the parent has experienced depression but has overcome it.To know that the parent struggled with the same thing will give the child hope that things can be better in the future. The child will also feel more connected because he now knows you have shared in the same struggle.
Anonymous
December 12th, 2017 10:48pm
i think so. it shows compassion and empathy and allows the child to feel a bond with the parent that wasnt there before
endearingLion70
May 15th, 2018 12:43pm
It will be helpful if the parent will tell the child how they overcomed their past as an example and a way to show that there is hope.