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Can chronic pain cause depression/Anxiety?

7 Answers
Last Updated: 01/02/2020 at 8:03pm
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United States
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Top Rated Answers
Anonymous
December 12th, 2017 2:11am
Yes. Living with chronic pain can cause depression and anxiety because dealing with that pain every day and trying to accomplish normal things is tougher and that can cause depression/anxiety.
ElephantTiger1
November 23rd, 2017 6:40am
Yes, chronic pain can cause depression and anxiety. I am really sorry if this has happened to you, but I know that you are brave and strong enough to get through it. I struggle with all three of these and my advice would be to talk to someone about it and remember that you are never alone. Good luck and remember there are always people that love and care about you, that are willing to help in anyone that they can.
DrumDude
December 11th, 2017 1:42am
It sure can. The body and mind are closely aligned. When our body is hurting, our mental/emotional health is likely to suffer.
wonderfullLake74
March 27th, 2018 8:28am
Of course! It is very difficult and can be quite depressing to live with chronic pain. I like to say to people to take it one day at a time, find whatever you can do to distract yourself from the pain, and find something to do that makes you feel better about yourself and your life,,, as well as continue the quest of finding healing,
LetItOut5621
January 2nd, 2020 8:03pm
In fact chronic pain and depression/anxiety are very linked together and constitute a viscious circle. Chronic pain can cause depression/anxiety and also depression/anxiety may cause chronic pain. The fact that chronic pain doesn't have a cure and we only manage the symptoms, flares up can be sometimes very disabling and unpredictable depending on the case. So all this impact our personality, social life and interaction. Sometimes we tend to avoid participating in social activities due to debilitating pains or fear of unpredictable flare up. People sometimes have hard time to understand this and tend to judge people as the antisocial, the cry baby without knowing how much this person is suffering and end up marginalizing these people. So constant fear and marginalization can deteriorate someone's mental health and may lead to suicide. Help these people around you, be there for them, understand when they say no, you never know you may be indirectly saving a life.
Havingfuninthesnow
March 1st, 2018 5:56am
Good question - according to my MD's and therapist the answer is yes. Do you have MD's/Quarterback on your side to help you?
PainedAndConfused
August 22nd, 2019 6:47pm
Unfortunately the answer is yes it most definitely can. I have depression because of the chronic pain as the pain limits what I can do and my mood takes a massive hit because of it. You end up feeling a bit useless because you cannot do that same things that you used to do and things are harder to do so that can trigger the depression. My mood was never this bad before the pain got bad. Make sure you speak to you doctor about it as they can help you or give you the information of support groups or treatments available to you in your area