How do I know if my friend has postpartum depression?

58 Answers
Last Updated: 01/12/2019 at 9:43am
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Top Rated Answers
Anonymous
October 8th, 2016 9:39am
It's not wise to diagnose other people, friends, family or not. Only that person knows what they are experiencing, how they feel, what they are thinking. You should have a conversation with this person before you continue talking about them behind their back. Say something like "I'm worried about you. Can we talk? How are you feeling lately?" When appropriate say, "I've gotta be honest: I'm worried you might have postpartum depression. I'm worried about my friend and I'd feel better if you read some postpartum material with me, or looked into it on your own time."
Anonymous
May 25th, 2016 3:07pm
if she feels overwhelmed, guilty if she is irritable and cries Depends how well she seems to bond with her baby
Allyisnothere
August 13th, 2016 11:22am
Look for any major changes in him/her after childbirth. They may have great sadness, low energy, may be very tired, be irritable, have anxiety, might not be eating well or eating more than they normally do and may have crying episodes.
Anonymous
August 27th, 2017 8:18am
Postpartum depression looks different (it effects all women that have it differently) so it is not that easy as just looking at your friend and "knowing" she has postpartum depression. being a new mum can be isolating, challenging and even a little scary at times. Speaking with your friend and being there for her is the best way for her to feel comfortable to open up to you if she is feeling a it more than the baby blues, and if she does open up to you and let you know she might be struggling, support her and help her get help, speaking with her dr or a therapist might be a good idea for her. if you are worried about your friend and you have tried talking to her but you still feel unsure then there is this website http://www.postpartumprogress.com/the-symptoms-of-postpartum-depression-anxiety-in-plain-mama-english I would still say speaking with your friend is the best way to help her and to know what is going on with her though.
Amie709
March 31st, 2018 12:12am
may have a detachment to the baby, may show a lack of self care (dirty clothes, unkempt hair etc), crying, unable to sleep, lack of emotions. sadly, postpartum depression can look different depending on the person and the severity so the most important thing is to just look for things that are out of the ordinary while keeping in mind that having a new baby can make everything a little out of the ordinary
courageousMagic24 - Expert in Family Stress
March 23rd, 2016 10:51pm
If he starts to withdraw from activities, and when he goes to the doctor and gets his tests done, the results will show.
Greatlistener87
March 24th, 2016 1:48am
If your friends character really changes the moment she steps into motherhood. The definition of postpartum depression is: depression suffered by a mother following childbirth, typically arising from the combination of hormonal changes, psychological adjustment to motherhood, and fatigue.
Mia27Elephants
March 24th, 2016 12:23pm
If your friends mood really changed going into motherhood. If you are really worried tell her to go talk to her doctor she might have a hormonal imbalance.
Anonymous
March 26th, 2016 6:48am
Without medical advice you cannot diagnose her, you an only be there for her and offer advice when needed, Maybe you can suggest taking her to a doctor.
hopefulLight92
April 3rd, 2016 9:10am
There are some classic signs about postpartum depression. You can search for them online and if you feel that your friend demonstrates them, you can talk to her directly. You can also share your concren with her family.
AshcoSensei
April 7th, 2016 6:48pm
Have you asked them? Or have they possibly hinted or shown possible characteristics that point to that? Makes sure to discuss it with your friend. It wouldnt be good to make an assumption.
ColorfulMindHeartOfDepth
May 3rd, 2016 10:54pm
Have they exhibited symptoms? Has it come up in conversation and they get uncomfortable? Have they shown signs of it or brought it up? Have they told you they might have it?
MadnessTrash
May 13th, 2016 5:42pm
The internet has lots of useful websites. health.gov is a website than can help identify the symptoms.
Anonymous
May 14th, 2016 11:33pm
It is depression right after childbirth, The symptoms of Postpartum depression are signs such as Difficulty bonding with their new baby, Anger, Sadness, Etc. The same symptoms as regular depression except it happens right after the mother gives birth to her new child.
Anonymous
May 22nd, 2016 2:51pm
Try and recomed them to see a doctor, if not be there for them if they need someone to lend an ear to help
HereToHelpYou742
May 26th, 2016 8:01pm
People may experience: Mood: anger, anxiety, guilt, hopelessness, inability to feel pleasure, mood swings, or panic attack Whole body: fatigue, loss of appetite, or restlessness Psychological: depression, fear, or repeatedly going over thoughts Behavioral: crying or irritability Cognitive: lack of concentration or unwanted thoughts Weight: weight gain or weight loss Also common: insomnia
Anonymous
June 24th, 2016 2:06am
I would know that my friend has postpartum depression if she has been feeling alone, worthless, sad, or despaired after she had recently given birth to her baby. She may also get tearful and cry.
bubblytobot
July 6th, 2016 6:09am
You can ask her. Just don't go playing doctor and studying her like a science experiment. Don't go all psycho-analytic on your friend. If you want to know, just go online and see the signs of postpartum depression. So if she does show some of the signs, just don't throw it in her face and tell her to get her life together. Address it in a calm matter, don't make it seem as though she's messed up. Go up to her and say, "Hey, I'm really worried about you. Have you been to a doctor? I'm concerned about your well-being." See how it goes from there.
NTaraSunrise19
July 6th, 2016 3:41pm
Your friend may have postpartum depression after giving birth. You should support her and listen to her in any way you can, and offer assistance. As well, you can suggest her to go to a doctor.
SaturatedSunrise13
July 24th, 2016 1:28am
The birth of a baby can trigger a jumble of powerful emotions, from excitement and joy to fear and anxiety. But it can also result in something you might not expect — depression. Many new moms experience the "postpartum baby blues" after childbirth, which commonly include mood swings, crying spells, anxiety and difficulty sleeping. Baby blues typically begin within the first two to three days after delivery, and may last for up to two weeks. But some new moms experience a more severe, long-lasting form of depression known as postpartum depression. Rarely, an extreme mood disorder called postpartum psychosis also may develop after childbirth. Postpartum depression isn't a character flaw or a weakness. Sometimes it's simply a complication of giving birth. If you have postpartum depression, prompt treatment can help you manage your symptoms — and enjoy your baby.
Morgan321
July 30th, 2016 3:36pm
The best way to find out if your friend is going through anything is by talking to them, ask them if they are okay, some people just need a hand in the dark
Anonymous
August 3rd, 2016 3:18am
Oooh would be a good idea to look into the symptoms online in as much detail as can be and find a way to discuss this and refer even more help to.
helpfulHeart67
August 7th, 2016 12:36am
If you have any reason to believe that your friend has postpartum depression, you should tell her parent(s) and tell her to seek professional help.
Anonymous
August 7th, 2016 6:38pm
You can talk to your friend and find some information about postpartum depression. It is good that you care about your friend, do not leave her alone.
LorenzosLife
August 28th, 2016 3:27pm
just try to be in tune with how they are acting.. do they seem to wanna be alone or inside more of the time? are they more gloomy than usual? how are their grades in school if you are in school? alot of things play into depression. keep tabs on how they are doing and just be there for them no matter what. they need to feel like someone cares. they are lucky to have a friend like you.
royalApple76
August 31st, 2016 10:47pm
Speaking with your friend about what their going through is always a good place to start. Make sure your friend is in a space where they feel safe, and try to be as open and non-judgmental as you can. Make sure your friend knows they can open up to you about anything they are feeling right now, but remember they may not feel comfortable talking about this with you. And that is okay.
SilentFlame
September 1st, 2016 9:18am
Most of the time he's pretty quite. He wants to be alone way more of often than usual. Another thing would be that he keeps lying in bed for hours without doing anything
taniaviridiana
September 8th, 2016 3:30am
I try to be as understanding as I can be and listen to her and help her as much as I can and show her all my love and support.
WNoelle10
September 8th, 2016 8:50pm
The best way you can know, it ask. By asking, you are showing that you care and that you can tell something is wrong. By acknowledging you know her and that she isn’t being herself, this will help her feel like she is not alone, and that you are there to help. After you ask, be a good listener and express empathy and support.
HeyItsAshy
September 29th, 2016 12:06pm
If you think that your friend might have postpartum depression, talking to him/her might help. Instead of jumping to conclusions, talk to them about it.